SAN ANTONIO — The blood type diet originated from a naturopathic physician and author, Dr. Peter D'Adamo. He wrote a book called "Eat Right for Type" in 1996. He claims that your blood profile is connected to specific exercises and foods that can help you achieve your ideal weight.

"The theory behind it, is that we somehow carry the genetic traits," explained Annie Bell, registered dietitian at Fit Therapy of Texas. "Different blood types are tied to the ability to absorb and utilize certain nutrients in food."

The book breaks down the four different blood types and lists recommendations.

Type A blood: It's suggested to eat dark leafy greens, soy and olive oil. But refined sugar, mushrooms and beef should be avoided. It claims yoga is an effective workout.

Type B blood: Green vegetables, eggs and liver can help in weight loss. However, foods such as chicken, corn or wheat are not good. Hiking, cycling and swimming are recommended as exercises

Type AB blood: You should eat green vegetables and tofu but avoid chicken, beans or corn. Yoga, tennis and cycling are recommended as effective workouts.

Type O blood: You should eat high-protein foods and avoid dairy or wheat. It's suggested that high-intensity workouts are the best.

Bell said while the diet sounds believable, there's not enough scientific evidence to back it up. There hasn't been enough research done in peer-reviewed studies to solidify the claims. The registered dietitian added that the suggestions focus on what's already proven to lose weight.

"In all of the plans, he's addressing nutrition, physical activity, mental health and stress management," Bell said. "I think perhaps, people want something to blame their bad habits on: 'Oh, it's my blood type,' or it could also be they want that individualized approach."

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Lycia Torres, a personal trainer at Fit Therapy of Texas, said: "Our system is one full system. It all integrates from our internal gut. If our internal gut is healthy, every part of our body will be. It's really important to get moving, even if its 15 minutes a day."

Bell and Torres are in agreement that the blood type diet recommendations aren't harmful and may work for some people. But the bottom line is it has nothing to do with your blood type.

"Exercise is hard. Changing your diet can be hard, sure, but starting out with diet and gradually adding exercise to it, will really make a difference in your life," Bell said.